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Journal Article

Quality Minus Junk

We show that a quality-minus-junk (QMJ) factor that goes long high-quality stocks and shorts low-quality stocks earns significant risk-adjusted returns in the U.S. and globally. Also, controlling for quality resurrects the otherwise moribund size effect.

Working Paper

Trading Costs

Using live trade data from a large institutional money manager over a 19-year period, we find actual trading costs to be an order of magnitude smaller than previous studies suggest.

Working Paper

The Earnings Announcement Premium and Trading Volume

We measure and provide explanation for the earnings announcement premium, when stock prices rise around scheduled earnings announcement dates. We show that the premium is large and strongly related to the surge in volume around announcement dates.

Journal Article

Size Matters, If You Control Your Junk

When it comes to equity investing, size matters—and in a bigger way than once thought—but only when controlling for junk. We examine seven challenges that have been hurled at the size effect and dismantle each one by controlling for a firm's quality.

Journal Article

Betting Against Correlation: Testing Theories of the Low-Risk Effect

What drives the low-risk effect? We test whether it's driven by leverage constraints (and thus risk should be measured using beta) or behavioral effects (and thus risk should be measured by idiosyncratic risk).

Journal Article

Betting Against Beta

A basic premise of the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) is that all agents invest in the portfolio with the highest Sharpe ratio, or expected excess return per unit of risk, and leverage or de-leverage this portfolio to suit their risk preferences. However, many investors — such as individuals, pension funds and mutual funds — are constrained in the leverage that they can take, and therefore overweight risky securities instead.

Journal Article

Fact, Fiction and Momentum Investing

Momentum is the phenomenon that securities that have performed well relative to peers (winners) on average continue to outperform, and securities that have performed relatively poorly (losers) tend to continue to underperform.

Journal Article

Fact, Fiction and Value Investing

Value investing has been a part of the investment lexicon for at least the better part of a century, yet confusion about it remains.

Journal Article

The Small World of Investing: Board Connections and Mutual Fund Returns

Information moves security prices.

White Paper

A New Core Equity Paradigm

Combining successful investing styles to magnify their effects represents a new paradigm in active equity-portfolio management. Core Equities integrates value, momentum and profitability styles to offer a more persistent, systematic approach.