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Bibliography

Momentum Bibliography

We have compiled a list of books, journal articles and working papers that were helpful in developing our research around momentum strategies.

Book

Expected Returns on Major Asset Classes

Expected returns are arguably the most important input into investment decisions. By broadening the traditional paradigm of expected return estimation, we think investors have the ability achive better-diversified portfolios and more forward-looking analysis.

Book

Expected Returns: An Investors Guide to Harvesting Market Rewards

Finance theories have changed dramatically over the past 30 years, away from the restrictive theories of the single-factor CAPM, efficient markets, and constant expected returns.

Perspective

A Comment on Cochrane's Recent Blog Post

Even the guys we admire pick on momentum! Here are some of Cliff's quick thoughts to John Cochrane's post on the topic, included in the comments section of his blog.

Journal Article

The Devil in HML's Details

This paper challenges the standard method for measuring “value” used in academic work on factor pricing.

Journal Article

Value and Momentum Everywhere

We find consistent value and momentum return premia across eight diverse markets and asset classes, and a strong common factor structure among their returns.

Journal Article

Fact, Fiction and Momentum Investing

Momentum is the phenomenon that securities that have performed well relative to peers (winners) on average continue to outperform, and securities that have performed relatively poorly (losers) tend to continue to underperform.

Journal Article

Pronounced Momentum Patterns Ahead of Major Events

Many financial asset measures exhibit a weak continuation tendency.

Journal Article

Do Industries Explain Momentum?

The ability to outperform buy-and-hold strategies by acquiring past winning stocks and selling past losing stocks, commonly referred to as "individual stock momentum," remains one of the most puzzling of these anomalies, both because of its magnitude (up to 12 percent abnormal return per dollar long on a self-financing strategy per year) and because of the peculiar horizon pattern that it seems to follow: Trading based on individual stock momentum appears to be a poor strategy when using a short historical horizon for portfolio formation (especially less than one month); it is highly profitable at intermediate horizons (up to 24 months, although it is strongest in the 6- to 12-month range); and is again a poor strategy at longer horizons. This paper largely focuses on the positive persistence in stock returns (or momentum effect) over intermediate investment horizons (6 to 12 months) and explores various explanations for its existence.

Journal Article

The Role of Shorting, Firm Size and Time on Market Anomalies

The pervasiveness, robustness and magnitude of return premia associated with size, value and momentum has made them the focal point for discussions of market efficiency, etc.